Rape Whistle 2.0

Rape whistle 2.0; uses smartphone to call for help. I wonder if it’ll turn out to be effective.
http://igg.me/at/first-sign-technologies

Rape in Asia

IRIN describes a UN report today with the results of a survey in Asia on rape and GBV.* The study was also published in The Lancet. The survey interviewed 10,168 men in 6 countries from Jan. 2011-Dec. 2012: Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Papua New Guinea. The study found the country with the highest prevalence of men who have raped women was Papua New Guinea:

“with 62 percent of the men interviewed there indicating they had raped a woman.” (IRIN)

The study probably found higher rates of rape than previous surveys in part because it never used the word “rape” in the questionnaire, asking instead (about non-partner rape) about having “forced a woman who was not your wife or girlfriend at the time to have sex” or having “had sex with a woman who was too drunk or drugged to indicate whether she wanted it”. Novel concept, that (that rapists might not think of the rapes they committed as rapes or that they’d show social desirability bias if the word “rape” were used).

It also found that:

“The most common motivation perpetrators gave for rape was a sense of sexual entitlement – the belief that men have a right to sex with women regardless of consent (73 percent of respondents). More than half said it was for entertainment (53 percent), while alcohol, often assumed to be a common trigger for violence, was the least common response.” (IRIN)

It’s interesting, though not surprising, that entitlement is the top motivation. Entitlement and entertainment. I just watched the first half of “Half the Sky” today and the focus seemed more on shaming rape victims and extending that shame to family members, who then turn on the victim. It’s just depressing how far there is to go, how difficult it is, and how easy it is to regress in encouraging cultural change that empowers women and teaches men to treat women as equals and not as objects they are entitled to use for their sexual gratification.

I wonder what the reasons could be for alcohol being the least common response. Would that be evidence in favor of or against the oft-cited adage that “alcohol doesn’t make you do anything you wouldn’t want to do when you were sober–it just gives you the ‘courage’ to actually do it (i.e. it disinhibits you)”? While I was in India this summer, I got into a bit of an argument with some friends about the statewide ban on alcohol instituted under Chief Minister of Gujarat, Narendra Modi. They seemed convinced that such a policy had all-but-eliminated domestic violence in the state. Needless to say, I am not convinced. I’m not even convinced that, individual liberties aside, the policy is actually a net benefit for the people of Gujarat. Alcohol deserves its bad reputation as possibly the first or second most harmful drug on earth, but I wonder if anti-alcohol-abuse campaigns that focus on DV aren’t obstacles to DV prevention in the long term.

*The IRIN site crashed and was giving 503 errors at the time of writing this article. The website for Partners For Prevention (who conducted the study) was down, too, according to NPR. Paranoid me wonders if it wasn’t sexist hackers angry about the study. Let’s hope I’m wrong.